MENY
This is the study programme for 2019/2020. It is subject to change.


This course is based on the introductory courses in English and provides the student with advanced knowledge of two sub-disciplines within English studies: Linguistics and Literature. This course will investigate a set of literary texts in terms of their significance within an always evolving literary tradition in terms of genre and critical analysis. Topics offered to receive this guidance may vary from year to year. Students gain insight into the discourse and method for doing B.A. thesis work the following term.

Learning outcome

Knowledge
Upon completion of the course, the students will have gained knowledge of
  • Dialect, standard language and language variation
  • Gender, age and social class as factors influencing speech variation
  • Language contact and language change
  • Various tendencies in British and/or American society and culture
  • Major literary themes and textual relationship to society and culture
  • Intertextuality within periods of literature and characteristics/evolution of literary genres
  • Engagement with alternate scholarly positions around a particular research question
  • Theoretical approaches to literary texts and cultural expression in a broad sense

Skills
By the end of the course, the student will be able to:
  • Reflect upon central theories, concepts and perspectives within the fields of sociolinguistics and literature
  • Evaluate the importance of the different sub-disciplines within English studies as a Whole
  • Describe various levels of speech variation
  • Analyse speech variation in relation to social variables, such as gender, age, social class and region, and discuss different attitudes to Language
  • Describe and explain central aspects of society and literature in the literary periods treated
  • Analyse and evaluate central concepts and themes in terms of the cultural and/or literary context
  • Do close reading and interpretation of literary texts as evidence for arguments
  • Use, evaluate and incorporate source material into projects at an advanced Level

General competencies
Upon completion of the course, the students:
  • Will have mastered the two sub-disciplines to such an extent that they are able to choose a topic for their BA thesis within one of the two sub-disciplines
  • Will be able to express themselves correctly and academically both in writing and orally
  • Will have learned to read texts closely and interpret them

Contents

Sociolinguistics
This part of the Engelsk Fordypning course will provide students with an insight into the field of sociolinguistics and speech variation. The main focus will be on the following concepts: dialect, standard language and correctness, speech variation based on social variables such as social class and gender, language contact and multilingualism, and language change. The main goal will be to raise students' awareness of the influence of the social and cultural contexts on speech variation.
Literature
This part of the Engelsk Fordypning course will provide students with insight into a particular set of questions arising from selected texts and genres as they relate not only to the chosen periods in literature, but to previous periods as well. Through the study of novels, poetry, drama or prose and critical/theoretical texts, the students will examine how themes develop in relation to contemporary society as well as with past literary modes and socio-historical contexts. How can the chosen texts be read in the light of the major concepts and themes of the period? What formal ways are themes are expressed?

Required prerequisite knowledge

One of the following alternatives:
  • ENG100 Introduction to the English Language, ENG105 British and Irish Literature, ENG140 The Sounds of English, ENG165 American Literature and Culture, ENG180 Uses of English with didactics
  • ENG100 Introduction to the English Language, ENG140 The Sounds of English, ENG165 American Literature and Culture, ENG180 Uses of English with didactics
  • ENG115 An Introduction to Literature in English, ENG145 Introduction to the English language, ENG175 American Literature and Culture
  • ENG115 An Introduction to Literature in English, ENG175 American Literature and Culture, ENG195 English Phonetics and Phonology
  • ENG115 An Introduction to Literature in English, ENG145 Introduction to the English language, ENG195 English Phonetics and Phonology
  • ENG145 Introduction to the English language, ENG175 American Literature and Culture, ENG195 English Phonetics and Phonology

Other course combinations may be approved if they are equivalent.

Students must have a minimum of 50 ECTS in introductory English courses or equivalent in order to begin the specialization.

BA students must have a minimum of 45 ECTS in introductory English courses or equivalent in order to begin the specialization.

Exam

Home exam and oral exam
Weight Duration Marks Aid
Oral exam1/230 minutesA - F
Home exam1/23 daysA - FAll.
Home exam (Literature) and oral exam (Sociolinguistics).
Both exams need to be passed in order to get the final course grade.
English language and academic writing skills are taken into account in the grading, as well as the course content.

Coursework requirements

Group research project, 75% attendance
The group research project in Sociolinguistics must be presented in class and must be passed in order to be admitted to the exam in Sociolinguistics.
75% attendance is required to sit for the exams.

Course teacher(s)

Course coordinator
Sonya Louise Lundblad
Course teacher
Oliver Martin Traxel , Allen Clarence Jones , Peter Paul Ferry , Kjetil Vikhamar Thengs
Programme coordinator
Anne Siri Norland , Karen Marie Espeland

Method of work

Lectures.

Overlapping courses

Course Reduction (SP)
Specialization in English Language and Literature (ENG250_1) 10

Open to

Open to students accepted into the Bachelor programme (or Specialization) in English Language and Literature at the Department of Cultural Studies and Languages, provided that they have the prerequisite knowledge. Open to exchange students. Other students must apply within the given deadlines.

Course assessment

Quality control by students is a central element of the UiS plan to improve teaching. In the Department of Cultural Studies and Languages this system includes student evaluation of courses.

Literature

Primary texts: Never Let Me Go; Hamlet; Frankenstein; “To His Coy Mistress;” “Young Goodman Brown;” and “Everyday Use.” The short primary texts are in the Appendix of Guerin (below), therefore students purchase only the long primary texts in addition to Guerin: Never Let Me Go and the Norton Critical editions of Hamlet and Frankenstein.
Theory text: Guerin, Wilfred L. et. Al. A Handbook of Critical Approaches to Literature. Oxford UP, 2011. This is the only theory students buy for the course. It contains theory and theoretical readings of the same texts listed above (Hamlet, Frankenstein, “To His Coy Mistress,” “Young Goodman Brown,” and “Everyday Use.”)
Secondary source material: A range of theory-based/critical articles and/or book chapters (20-30 pages each) about the above primary texts will be assigned for consideration alongside the student's own free textual analysis (a pre-critical technique based on literariness i.e. genre/formal textual explication).

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Short selections posted to CANVAS from the following:
Adamson, H.D. Linguistics and English Literature. Cambridge UP: Cambridge, 2019. For use in the stylistics, textual analysis unit especially his Introduction and chapter on Metaphor and Metonymy. approx. 10 pages.
Booth, W. (1963). "The Rhetorical Stance." College Composition and Communication, 14 (3), 139-145.
Callahan, Patsy and Ann Dobyns. Literary Conversation: Thinking, Talking, and Writing About Literature. Allyn & Bacon, 1996. How to incorporate quotation, different reasons inside an essay. Pp.214-222.
Falke, Cassandra. The Phenomenology of Love and Reading. Bloomsbury Academic, 2017. This works with Guerin et. al. pp. 82-82 on Iser and reading literature phenomenologically with concepts of love as theoretical lens. short selection
Featherstone, Mike. Undoing Culture: Globalization, Postmodernism and Identity. Sage Publications, 1995. This is a response to postmodernism, students read pages 2-3. How to take de-centering after WW’s and work from a (sociological) positive claims about where the re-centering is happening (global community and university cooperation). Students read one page.
Felski, Rita. The Limits of Critique. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2015. Work to point out positives rather than accusing in cultural critique. a short selection.
Felski, Rita. The Uses of Literature. Blackwell: Oxford, 2008. a short selection.
Graff, Gerald and Cathy Birkenstein. They Say, I Say. W.W. Norton, 2006. Chapter 15. only pp.184-201.
Levinas, Emmanuel. Empathy/Alterity –snapshot only -Read with Falke above.
Lothe, Jakob. The Future of Literary Studies. Oslo: Novus Press, 2017. Introduction and short selections (possibly from Tonning, Falke, Armstrong, Bale, Meretoja. )
The Purdue OWL writing guide online : https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/mla_style/mla_style_introduction.html This is the student MLA Style guide for all things related to citing source material.
University of Toronto Advice on Academic Writing website http://advice.writing.utoronto.ca This website contains guides for writing, pdf’s to inform in-class writing exercises and to be used as writing reference guides for the home exam. Approx. 20-30 one-page pdf’s.


This is the study programme for 2019/2020. It is subject to change.

Sist oppdatert: 24.06.2019