MENY
This is the study programme for 2019/2020. It is subject to change.


The course provides an overview of the fields of first and second language literacy development, considering similarities and differences in the two. It covers theories, paradigm shifts, processes, practices and characteristics related to each. It addresses linguistic, psycholinguistic, sociolinguistic and educational perspectives linked to the development of literacy in a first and second language.

Learning outcome

Knowledge
The student will gain knowledge of:
  • Theories relating to first and second language literacy development
  • The role of the home environment in the emergence of literacy in children
  • Early first language reading and writing practices and characteristics
  • The role of literacy in the modern world
  • The link between first and second language literacy development
  • Key factors and processes influencing first and second language literacy development
  • Bilingual and multilingual perspectives on literacy
  • The role of reading in a second language
  • Challenges and characteristics of second language writing
  • Principles and ways of assessing second language literacy development
  • Researching second language literacy

Skills
By the end of the course, the student will be able to:
  • Account for changing perceptions of young children´s literacy capabilities
  • Explain the role of adults and the home environment in fostering literacy in young children
  • Describe the key phases of young children´s first language reading and writing development
  • Understand the role of literacy in the modern world
  • Understand processes and practices underlying the development of first language reading and writing in educational settings
  • Compare and relate to theories that explain first and second language literacy development
  • Account for the way first language literacy growth influences that of second language literacy development
  • Discuss factors important to bilingual and multilingual literacy
  • Analyse features of second language reading and writing development
  • Explain key factors that promote second language literacy development
  • Discuss different approaches to the teaching of second language reading and writing
  • Describe how second language literacy can be assessed
  • Understand principles and methods for researching second language literacy

General competence
By the end of the course, the student will be able to:
  • Read about, discuss and write about first and second language developmental literacy
  • Reflect upon and discuss the significance and nature of developmental literacy in the modern world
  • Reflect upon and discuss the significance and nature of second language literacy development in educational contexts
  • Discuss changing views on how best to promote the development of first and second language reading and writing

Contents

The first part of the course focuses on mother tongue literacy development during both the pre-school and school years. Attention is given to the concept of 'emergent literacy', which emphasizes the importance of the home, and especially parents, in fostering the roots of literacy. Different approaches to the teaching of reading are discussed, as are characteristics of children's early writing. Central reading and writing processes and practices linked to the development of reading and writing during the school years, for example extensive reading and writing as a process, are addressed.
The second part of the course builds on the first, but with a focus on second language literacy development. It looks at the relationship between first and second language literacy and also considers literacy from a bilingual and multilingual perspective. Key issues linked to the development of second language reading and writing include the role of reading in second language acquisition, approaches to the teaching of second language reading and writing, characteristics of second language writing, assessment, and research principles and methods.

Required prerequisite knowledge

None.

Exam

Weight Duration Marks Aid
Written exam1/16 hoursA - FEnglish-English dictionary.
As part of the assessment, English language and academic writing skills will be taken into consideration in addition to the course content.

Coursework requirements

Seminars 75%, Written assignment and oral presentation
Attendance at seminars is obligatory. Students who are absent from more than 25 % of the seminar meetings will not be allowed to sit the exam. The student has to be present for at least 2/3 of the duration of the individual seminar meeting for attendance to be recorded.
In addition, the student must submit a short written assignment (400-800 words), and give a satisfactory oral presentation of about 10 minutes on a topic approved by the tutor. The student must have completed both tasks in order to be allowed to sit the exam.
Students who get one or more assignment assessed as not approved at their first attempt, are given one opportunity to hand in a revised assignment.

Course teacher(s)

Course coordinator
Rebecca Anne Charboneau Stuvland
Course teacher
Dina Lialikhova , Kjetil Vikhamar Thengs , Sonya Louise Lundblad
Programme coordinator
Signe Ekenberg

Method of work

Lectures, seminars

Overlapping courses

Course Reduction (SP)
Literacy from a Developmental Perspective (MLI120_1) 15
Literacy from a Developmental Perspective (MLI320_1) 10
Literacy from a developmental perspective (MMLI320_1) 10
Second Language Literacy Development (MLI380_1) 7

Open to

Advanced teacher education for levels 8-13
Literacy Studies - Master's Degree Programme
Literacy Studies - Master's Degree Programme - Part-time

Course assessment

Quality control by students is a central element of the UiS plan to improve teaching. In the Department of Cultural Studies and Languages this system includes student evaluation of courses.

Literature

Grainger, Teresa (ed.). 2004. The RoutledgeFalmer Reader in Language and Literacy. London: Routledge Farmer. (chaps. 6, 7, 13, 15, 16) (pp. 66)
Hyland, Ken. 2003. Second Language Writing. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. (Chaps. 2, 5-9) (pp. 187).
The following texts will be available in a compendium:
Atwell, Nancy. 1998. In The Middle. New Understandings About Writing, Reading and Learning. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. Chap. 4 (pp. 28)
Barton, David. 2007. Literacy: An Introduction to the Ecology of Written Language (2nd Ed.). Oxford: Blackwell. Chaps 9-10 (pp.41)
Cambourne, Brian. 1983. ´Learning about learning by watching little kids writing.´English-In-Australia, 66: 18-26. (pp. 8)
Charboneau, R. 2013. "The conventional versus the innovative: Comparing two approaches to English as a foreign language (EFL) reading instruction in Norwegian primary schools" In Pareliussen, I., Moen, B.B., Reinertsen A., & Solhaug, T. (eds.), FoU i praksis 2012 Conference Proceedings. (pp. 52-60.) Akademika forlag: Trondheim (pp. 9)
Chew, Charles. 1985. ´Instruction can link reading and writing.´ In Hansen, J. et al. (eds.), Breaking Ground: Teachers Relate Reading and Writing in the Elementary Classroom. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. 169-173. (pp. 5)
Cunningham, P.M. 2015. "Best practices in teaching phonological awareness and phonics" In Gambrell, L.B & Morrow, L.M. (eds.), Best Practices in Literacy Instruction (fifth edition), pp.169-194. New York: The Guildford Press. (pp.25)
Day, Richard R. and Julian Bamford. 1998. Extensive Reading in the Second Language Classroom. New York: CUP. (chaps. 4,6) (pp.30)
Dickinson, David, K. and Diane E. Beals. 1994. ´Not by print alone: Oral language supports for early literacy development. In Lancy, David F. (ed.), Children´s Emergent Literacy: From Research to Practice. London: Praeger. 29-40. (pp. 11)
Drew, I. and Pedersen, R. R. 2012. "Readers Theatre: A group reading approach to texts in mainstream classes". In Hasselgreen, A., Drew I. & B. Sørheim (eds.), The Young Language Learner: Research-Based Insights into Teaching and Learning, 71-84. Bergen: Fagbokforlaget. (pp.13)
Edwards, Viv. 2009. Learning to be Literate: Multilingual Perspectives. Bristol: Multilingual Matters. (Chaps. 2, 4) (pp.25)
Grabe, William and Robert B. Kaplan. 1996. Theory and Practice of Writing. New York:Longman. Chap 1 (pp.18-35) and Chap 4 (pp. 43)
Grabe, William. 2009. Reading in a Second Language. Cambridge: CUP. Chaps 2,15 (37pp)
Graves, Donald. 1985. ´The reader´s audience.´ In Hansen et al. (eds.), Breaking Ground: Teachers Relate Reading and Writing in the Elementary Classroom (pp. 193-199). Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. (pp.6)
Hall, Nigel. 1994. ´The emergence of literacy.´ In Stierer B. and J. Maybin (eds.), Language, Literacy and Learning in Educational Practice (pp.15-30). Clevedon: Multilingual Matters. (pp.15)
Holme, Randal. 2004. Literacy: An Introduction. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. Chaps 1,14. (pp. 39)
Kern, Richard. 2000. Literacy and Language Teaching. Oxford: OUP. Chap 8 (pp.43)
Kern, R. 2015. Language, Literacy and Technology. Cambridge: CUP. Chap 9 (pp.17)
Krashen, S. D. 1982. Principles and Practice in Second Language Acquisition. Oxford: Pergamon. (Chap 2, pp.9-32) (pp.23)
Krulatz, A., Dahl, A., & Flogenfeldt, M.E. 2018. Enacting Multilingualism. Oslo: Cappelen Damm Akademisk. (pp.89-118) (pp. 29)
Lancy, David, F. 1994. ´The conditions that support Emergent Literacy.´ In Lancy, David F. (ed.), Children´s Emergent Literacy: From Research to Practice (pp.1-20). London: Praeger. (pp.20)
Lundberg, Ingvar and Pirjo Linnakyla. 1993. Teaching Reading Around the World. Hamburg: IEA. Chap 1 (pp.6)
Newkirk, Thomas. 1984. ´Archimedes´ dream.´ Language Arts, Volume 61: 341-350. (pp.10)
Pellegrini, A.D. and Lee Galda. 1994. ´Early Literacy from a developmental Perspective.´ In Lancy, David F. (ed.), Children´s Emergent Literacy: From Research to Practice (21-28). London: Praeger. (pp.9)
Schick, Ruth et al. 1992. ´Factors predicting writing performance.´ In Purves, Alan C. (ed.), The IEA Study of Written Composition 11: Education and Performance in Fourteen Countries, (pp.153-167). Exeter: Pergamon. Chap 6 (pp.14).
Schieffelin, Bambi, B. and Marilyn Cochran-Smith. 1984. "Learning to read culturally: Literacy before schooling". In Goelman H. et al. (eds.), Awakening to Literacy (pp.3-23). Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann. (pp.20)
Silva, Tony. 1993. ´Toward an understanding of the distinct nature of L2 writing: the ESL research and its implications.´ TESOL Quarterly 27, 657-77. (pp.23)
Svensson, Ann-Katrin. 1994. ´Helping parents help their children: Early language stimulation in the child´s home. In Lancy, David F. (ed.), Children´s Emergent Literacy: From Research to Practice (pp.79-92). London: Praeger. (pp.13)
Teale, William H. 1986. ´Home background and young children´s literacy development´ in William H. Teale and Elizabeth Sulzby (eds.), Emergent Literacy: Writing and Reading (pp. 173-206). Norwood, NJ: Ablex. (pp.33
Vygotsky, Lev S. 1978. Mind in Society. London: Harvard University Press. (pp. 84-91) (pp. 7)
Vygotsky, Lev S. 1983. ´The prehistory of written language.´ In M. Martlew (ed.), The
Psychology of Written Language (pp. 279-291). Bath: Wiley. (pp.12)
(ca. 820 pages)


This is the study programme for 2019/2020. It is subject to change.

Sist oppdatert: 24.08.2019