MENY
This is the study programme for 2019/2020. It is subject to change.


This module is concerned with the importance of contexts and conventions for the reading, understanding and teaching of historical texts. Older texts may not be immediately legible for modern readers due to cultural and linguistic changes that occur with time. Secondary-school pupils are expected to read and learn about central English works from earlier periods; this course is designed to provide teachers with the competence to guide them.

Learning outcome

Knowledge:
The students will gain knowledge of:
  • the challenges involved in reading and interpreting historical texts
  • the development of genres from an historical perspective
  • selected literary texts from a particular historical period
  • the importance of various contexts and conventions in the interpretation of historical texts
  • how our own contexts and conventions shape reading practices
  • how textbooks in the Norwegian secondary school present English historical texts

Skills:
By the end of the course, the students will be able to:
  • place different literary genres and their development in an historical context
  • analyse selected works of literature and place them within a particular historical context
  • critically examine various readings of historical texts
  • reflect upon the use of literary, linguistic and cultural conventions in several literary texts
  • discuss how the contexts and conventions of readers influence and shape the reception and teaching of literary texts
  • reflect upon the use of historical texts in secondary school and develop good strategies for their teaching

General competence:
By the end of the course, the students will be able to:
  • understand how our own contexts and conventions affect our reading of historical texts.
  • be aware of historical contexts and conventions into their own reading of historical texts
  • introduce an awareness of historical contexts and conventions into their use of historical texts in teaching

Contents

This module is concerned with the importance of contexts and conventions for the reading, understanding and teaching of historical texts. Older texts may not be immediately legible for modern readers due to cultural and linguistic changes that occur with time. Secondary-school pupils are expected to read and learn about central English works from earlier periods; this course is designed to provide teachers with the competence to guide them. It aims to make students aware of the historical contexts and conventions that have shaped the texts, helping them to make sense of the texts in their own reading and to reflect critically on their own expectations as a modern reader. In addition, it provides the students with approaches and tools for communicating this awareness in their teaching.
The module focusses on central texts from the English literary canon, as well as less canonical, yet relevant texts. These are studied with particular emphasis on their uses of cultural and literary conventions, making reference to the development of genres and their historical, social, economic and linguistic contexts. In addition to the historical texts themselves, the students will study their representation in current school textbooks.

Required prerequisite knowledge

None.

Exam

Assignments and oral exam
Weight Duration Marks Aid
Written assignment 11/6 A - FAll.
Written assignment 21/6 A - FAll.
Written assignment 32/6 A - FAll.
Oral exam2/6 A - FNone permitted
The expected total of written work adds up to ca 4,000 words. Specific requirements and submission dates for all assignments are made available at the beginning of the semester.

Coursework requirements

75% attendace
Seminars. 75% attendance is mandatory. Students who are absent from more than 25% of the seminar meetings will not have their work graded. The student has to be present for at least 2/3 of the duration of the individual seminar meeting for attendance to be recorded.

Course teacher(s)

Course coordinator
Merja Riitta Stenroos , Brita Strand Rangnes
Course teacher
Sonya Louise Lundblad
Programme coordinator
Signe Ekenberg

Method of work

Lectures and seminars

Open to

Advanced teacher education for levels 8-13

Course assessment

Quality control by students is a central element of the UiS plan to improve teaching. In the Department of Cultural Studies and Languages this system includes student evaluation of courses.

Literature

Shakespeare, William: Romeo and Juliet, ed. Jill Levenson, Oxford World's Classics, Oxford: University Press. 2008.
Shakespeare, William: Twelfth Night, or what you will, ed. Roger Warren and Stanley Wells, Oxford World's Classics, Oxford: University Press. 2008.
Shakespeare, William: The Taming of the Shrew, ed. Barbara Hodgdon. The Arden Shakespeare. London: Methuen. 2010.
Shakespeare, William: Othello, the Moor of Venice, ed. Michael Neill, Oxford World's Classics, Oxford: University Press. 2008.
A selection of school texts from English textbooks for secondary school
Anipa, K. 2014. "The use of literary sources in historical sociolinguistic research" in J.M. Hernandez-Campoy and J.C. Conde-Silvestre (eds). The Handbook of Historical Sociolinguistics. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell. 170-190.
Boose, Lynda E. 1982. "The Father and the Bride in Shakespeare". PMLA, Vol 97, No 3. pp.325-347.
Bronfman, Judith. 1990. "Griselda, Renaissance Woman" in A. M. Haselkorn and B. S. Travitsky (eds), The Renaissance Englishwoman in Print. Counterbalancing the Canon. Amherst: The Univ. of Massachusetts Press. 211-223
Busse, Ulrich and Beatrix Busse. 2010. "Shakespeare" in A.H. Jucker and I. Taavitsainen (eds), Historical Pragmatics. Berlin: De Gruyter Mouton. 247-81.
Culpeper, Jonathan and Merja Kytö. 2010. Early Modern English Dialogues: Spoken Interaction as Writing. Chapters 2 and 14 ("Dialogic genres and their contexts" and "The distribution of talk: social roles in trial proceedings and play-texts"). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 21-60, 326-360.
Girard, René 1978. The Mimetic Desire of Paolo and Francesca" in To Double Business Bound. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins. 1-8.
Greene, Gayle. 1995. ""This That You Call Love": Sexual and Social Tragedy in Othello" in D.E Barker and I. Kamps (eds): Shakespeare and Gender: A History. London: Verso. 47-62.
Hackel, Heidi Brayman. 2004. ""Boasting of Silence": Woman readers in a patriarchal state" in Sharpe and Zwicker (eds): Reading, Society and Politics in Early Modern England. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 101-121.
Hope, Jonathan. 2012. "Shakespeare and the English Language" in P. Sargeant and J. Swann (eds), 2012, English in the World: History, Diversity, Change. Routledge/The Open University. 83-92.
Ilouz, Eva. 1997. "Introduction to the Sociology of Love" (excerpts). In Consuming the Romantic Utopia: Love and the Cultural Contradictions of Capitalism. Berkeley/LA/London: University of California Press. 1-13, 53-57.
Jucker, Andreas H. and Irma Taavitsainen. 2013. English Historical Pragmatics. Chapters 5, 7 (""For I thou thee, thou Traitor: terms of address", ""For your curteisie": forms of politeness and impoliteness"). Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. 73-91, 113-129.
Kielkiewicz-Janowiak, Agnieszka. 2014. "Class, age and gender-based patterns" in J. M. Hernandez-Campoy and J. C. Conde-Silvestre (eds), The Handbook of Historical Sociolinguistics. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell. 307-331.
Laqueur, Thomas 1990. Excerpts from Making Sex: Body and Gender from the Greeks to Freud. Harvard University Press.
Lewis, C. S. 1936. The Allegory of Love: A Study in Medieval Tradition. Chapter 1. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 1-43.
Nevalainen, Terttu. 2006. An Introduction to Early Modern English. Chapters 4,5 ("Old words and loan words", "Word-formation and semantic change"). Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. 45-72.
Orgel, Stephen. 1996. Impersonations. The performance of gender in Shakespeare´s England. Chapters 1-3. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 1-52.
Stone, Lawrence. 1979. "Family Characteristics" in The Family, Sex and Marriage in England 1500-1800 (abr. ed). New York: Harper. 69-88.
(the list is subject to revision)


This is the study programme for 2019/2020. It is subject to change.

Sist oppdatert: 24.08.2019