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The Norwegian Researcher School in Environmental Humanities (NoRS-EH)

NoRS-EH is an interdisciplinary initiative that aims to reinforce and strengthen thecontribution of Norwegian humanities scholars to environmental research and thegreat global challenges that we currently face.

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Facts
Partners

Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) University of Agder University of Bergen University of Oslo University of Stavanger

Contact

Chair: Dolly Jørgensen

NoRS-EH is an interdisciplinary initiative that aims to reinforce and strengthen the contribution of Norwegian humanities scholars to environmental research and the great global challenges that we currently face. Members will get the chance to participate in seminars at NoRS-Eh partner institutions at the universities of Oslo, Bergen, Stavanger, Agder and at NTNU. The research school's courses supplement those offered as part of PhD-programmes by the partner institutions and have a goal of ensuring that doctoral candidates throughout Norway have the opportunity to attend specialist seminars and have access to a national network in environmental humanities.

NoRS-EH offers its members a tripartite programme consisting of an overview course in environmental science, an extensive course in themes related to the environmental humanities with international participation, and development of a larger community for researchers and students in the field. PhD candidates from Norwegian universities who work with themes and research methodologies related to environmental science are welcome

to apply to these courses.

Environmental humanities (EH) is a relatively new but rapidly expanding radically transdisciplinary endeavourthat complements environmental science and public policy by focusing on the cultural, historical, artistic and ethical dimensions of environmental issues. EH broadly investigates the human-environment relationship, critically understanding our current planetary predicament as a crisis of environmental imagination which demands a pivotal paradigm shift in our values, habits, routines and representations. EH is a vital component to developing sustainable relations with our planet and its multitudinous inhabitants.

The project is funded by the Research Council of Norway's national research school programme from 2019-2025.

News

Latest news from NoRS-EH and its members.

NoRS-EH member Samuel Klee, University of Oslo, has won the Everett E. Edwards Award for the best article submitted to Agricultural History by a graduate student. His article “Assembling ‘The Camp’: Agricultural Labor and the Wartime Carceral State in Chesterfield Missouri, 1937-1972” will appear in the 95.4 (Fall 2021) issue of Agricultural History. Congratulations to Samuel!

About the Research School

NoRS-EH is a collaboration between seven universities (five partner institutions and two connected universities) throughout Norway with the goal of providing world-leading doctoral education in the environmental humanities. We offer our PhD researchers a tripartite programme of courses in the theory and methodology of environmental humanities, a specialist course in and development of an academic community, and activities to support the students.

Members of NoRS-EH get the opportunity to participate in seminars at the NoRS-EH partner institutions; the Universities of Oslo, Bergen, Stavanger, Agder and at NTNU. The research school's courses supplement the partner institutions' own PhD programmes and have the goal of ensuring that doctoral candidates throughout Norway have access to specialised seminars and to a national network in the environmental humanities.

NoRS-EH offers its members a tripartite programme consisting of an overview course in environmental science, an extensive course in themes related to the environmental humanities with international participation, and development of a larger community for researchers and students in the field. PhD candidates from Norwegian universities who work with themes and research methodologies related to environmental science are welcome

to apply to these courses.

The project is financed by the Research Council of Norway's national research school programme from 2019-2025.

  • Dolly Jørgensen (UiS, leder)
  • Karen Lykke Syse (UiO SUM)
  • Ursula Münster (UiO OSEH)
  • Kyrre Kverndokk (UiB)
  • Julia Leyda (NTNU)
  • May-Brith Ohman Nielsen (UiA)

PhD student representatives

  • Hilde Røsstad (UiA)
  • Gitte Westergaard (UiS)

External committee members

  • Marco Armiero (KTH Stockholm, Sweden)
  • Heather Anne Swanson (Aarhus University, Denmark)

Admission

Would you like to participate? Here you can find information on how to me a member of NoRS-EH.

PhD candidates who wish to apply must fulfil the following criteria:

• be a member of a PhD programme in Norway

• be working on research related to the environmental humanities

• be willing to collaborate in an education programme for researchers and to participate in joint activities

• admission is normally applied for at the start of the PhD programme

Decide whether your project fits the research school's profile. Discuss this with your supervisor(s). Your supervisor is expected to participate in the supervisor's seminar organised by NoRS-EH. Ensure that you meet the admissions criteria.

Send an email to the research school's coordinator Dolly Jørgensen with:

1. Project description

2. Application letter (max 500 words)

The application letter should contain your expectations about the research school's content, activities and why you think your research fits in with NoRS-EH. At the same time, explain your educational background and any professional experience you have. The application letter must also state that your supervisor agrees to you applying to the research school. You should also include in the application letter:

• your name and contact information

• date of admission to the PhD programme

• name of your PhD programme

• how your project is financed

• planned date of your Viva

• name of your supervisor

• how many credits you have completed

• are you full time or part time? (Give the percentage of your time you work on your dissertation)

  • the candidates choose for themselves which courses, subjects and symposiums they wish to participate in and which specific themes and content they wish to pursue
  • candidates are expected to participate actively on the research school's digital platform
  • travel and subsistence while participating in NoRS-EH courses are covered by the research school
  • your research will be presented on the research school's web page
  • access to a large network of national and international researches in the environmental humanities
  • be a part of a community of doctoral students

We have no set application deadlines - applications are evaluated as they come in. To receive expenses for participation in NoRS-Eh courses, your application must have been approved at least one month before the course.

Courses and subjects

The research school offers several courses for doctoral candidates. Here you can find information on future and previous courses.

The Centre for Development and the Environment (SUM) invites applicants to attend a PhD course entitled “Working with primary sources in environmental humanities. Fieldwork and labwork approaches in an environmental literacy perspective.” Universitetet i Agder is organizing this course in cooperation with the Norwegian Researcher School in Environmental Humanities (NoRS-EH).

The course will take place in person in Kristiansand from 13th - 16th September.

The objective of this course is to give the candidates hands-on experience with a variety of primary sources in environmental humanities that may expand their environmental literacy and enrich their concept of sources and their approach to source-work in their PhD-thesis or as an environmental humanities scholar.

The course will be half outdoor fieldwork in exposed coastal environments and in urban family gardens, and half labwork in indoor group settings.

The participants will need to bring sufficient wind and weather-proof personal out-door equipment suited for the locations and season, as well as a 20 minutes presentation of their own source work with samples of their main source types.

For this course the participants must be able to and comfortable with moving around outside, to use their body in physical source work and adapt to the environmental conditions.

Learning outcomes

After completing the course, the PhD-candidates will have

Knowledge

Advanced understanding of the concept of primary sources and hands on experience with variety of primary sources in environmental humanities

Advanced understanding of the concept of environmental literacy and also the ability to work with and reflect on the development of environmental literacy in their own source work and professional development.

Advanced understanding of the concept and impact of time and space in interpretation of sources and in development of environmental literacy. 

Skills

Acquired the ability to do discuss and analyse the different types of primary source material dealt with in the course and be better prepared to consider and expand the use of source material in their own research and professional work.

Discuss the impact of time and space in the work with and interpretation of primary sources.

Be able to reflect on their own professional development as researchers in environmental literacy terms and in particular in relation to their work with primary sources.

Carry out an advanced discussion of the specific source work in their thesis and of their own particular environmental literacy as a prerequisite for this work.

General competence 

Be able to identify and discuss the value of different aspects of environmental literacies within and beyond environmental humanities and reflect upon how these insights may be transformed into outreach or dissemination strategies.

Who can apply:

Participants must be enrolled in a PhD program to join this course and must be members of NoRS-EH.

Participants need to have prepared a 20 minutes presentation of their own source work with samples of their main source types.

For enquiries, please contact May-Brith Ohman Nielsen.

Applications must be made on the UiA web page for the course by clicking the påmelding button at the bottom of the page. The application deadline is 15th August.

Funding:

The course is held as part of the Norwegian Researcher School in Environmental Humanities (NoRS-EH), whose members will receive funding for travel and accommodation. Norway-based students are encouraged to first enroll as members of the School in order to receive funding. See here for more information and application details: https://www.uis.no/forskning-og-ph-d/ph-d-utdanning/forskerskolen-nors-eh/.

 PhD students in Norway or other countries may also apply, provided they can fund their own travel and accommodation.

Application details:

Interested students should apply on the UiA web page for the course by clicking the påmelding button at the bottom of the page. The application deadline is 15th August.

Preparation:

Participants need to have prepared a 20 minute presentation of their own source work with samples of their main source types.

The participants will need to bring sufficient wind and weather proof personal out-door equipment suited for the locations and season. Participants must be able to and comfortable with moving around outside, to use their body in physical source work and adapt to the weather and environmental conditions. Participants must bring camera and laptop computer.

Course materials will be provided before the course start at the online learning platform. Some publications on the reading list may be acquired through libraries or bookshops.

Syllabus and programme

35 hours of participation in lectures, workshops, seminars, field excursions, and group activity assignments during the 4 days of the course. Self-studies of 600 pages syllabus. One prepared 20 minute presentation during the course.

Participants must participate in all four days of the course. They must complete assignments throughout the course and a prepared 20 minute presentation of their own primary source work. A final assignment / exam paper of 3500 words must be completed, discussing the participants' own source work and how they develop their environmental literacy in relation to the source work in their PhD project.  The paper should also be based on the course content and curricula.

To qualify for credits the exam paper of 3500 words must be handed in before 20th November. The grading will be passed / not passed.

A full, detailed programme may be viewed on the UiA web page for the course.

Credits:

  • Credits: The course will give 5 CTS for participants who have completed the 3500 word paper and handed it in no later than 8 weeks after the course and passed the grading as accepted. The deadline for the final paper will be 20th November.

The Centre for Development and the Environment (SUM) invites applicants to attend a PhD course entitled “The Political Ecology of Pandemics.” SUM is organizing this course in cooperation with the Norwegian Researcher School in Environmental Humanities (NoRS-EH) and the Norwegian Political Ecology Network (POLLEN-Norway).

Instructors: Tony Weis, Professor, Western University, Canada; Frédéric Keck, Fellow, CNRS, France; Karen Lykke Syse, Associate Professor, Centre for Development and the Environment (SUM), University of Oslo; Timothy Pachirat, Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts

The objective of this interdisciplinary PhD course is to critically approach the relationship between food production and food consumption and pandemics in an environmental perspective. This involves addressing issues like the links between global food and fodder production and the transformation of rural areas.

In this course, we will focus on how ecosystems and small-scale food production have changed to industrial and hyper-industrial scales; explore the aspirations of consumers in the West and in countries with emerging economies; address the ongoing changes in the global organization of labor, and focus on its environmental impacts.

The Covid-19 pandemic has made governments, health organizations and citizens in general painfully aware of the entanglement of changing patterns of food production and consumption and lethal pathogens. Problematizing evolving ideas regarding the relationship between food and pandemics, both communicable and non-communicable, can open new ways to understand global capitalism and its effects. Accordingly, pandemics are a highly relevant starting point to study the global political and economic systems related to the food industry. As food production, and particularly meat production, turns ever-more global, new relationships between humans, animals and, increasingly, pathogens evolve. The social, economic and environmental impact is high, and future sustainability depends on how these relationships are managed.

Against this backdrop the course will address questions such as:

  • What are the relations between the global food system and pandemics?
  • How can perspectives from political ecology and environmental humanities contribute to new ways of thinking about non-humans in the relationship between food production and pandemic entanglements?
  • How have local and national environmental histories shaped and been shaped by industrial systems for food production (and meat in particular), and what are the consequences for animal and human health, welfare and wellbeing at large?
  • How are food production systems organized in terms of labor and how do workers in industrial food production cope with pandemic outbreaks and their aftermaths?

We would like to give this Ph.D. course physically here in Oslo rather than online. Due to the unpredictable nature of Covid19 and restrictions that differ geographically, we understand that this might be difficult to achieve both for us and for participants. Because of this, we are planning for both options, hoping to be able to welcome lecturers and Ph.D. students if and when this is possible, while planning for an online option if needs be.

Who can apply:

Participants must be enrolled in a PhD program to join this course. You can attend this course either at the

The interdisciplinary nature of the course will be most suitable for doctoral students engaging with different disciplines within the social sciences – such as anthropology, sociology, political science, geography, and development studies, as well as doctoral students working within the various branches of environmental humanities.

Doctoral students will be prioritized, although other applicants may be considered if space permits.

Should you have any practical enquiries, please do not hesitate to email the course secretariat pandefood2021@sum.uio.no.

Funding:

The course is free. Lunches will be provided.

The organisers have some funds available to cover the cost of accommodation (meals not included) for selected students from outside Norway. Similarly, there is funding available for a limited number of travel scholarships for selected students. Please consult point 3 under 'Application procedures'.

Students who are members of the Norwegian School for Environmental Humanities (NoRS-EH) will have the costs of their travel and accommodation paid for by the school. Please indicate your status as a NoRS-EH member in your application cover letter (point 3 below). If you are not a member of NoRS-EH but are enrolled in a PhD program in Norway and doing an environmental humanities project, you are urged to apply for membership in NoRS-EH.

Application details:

Interested students should state their motivation and upload the following via the Application Form on the SUM website.

  1. A cover letter signed by your Ph.D. supervisor or another person at your institution/workplace, stating your academic background and academic degree(s) held, your research interests and current research projects (if any), including estimated date of submission of doctoral thesis.
  2. CV
  3. Students from outside Norway may apply for a modest travel scholarship and/or accommodation support, by uploading a separate document along with their course application. If you wish to apply for a travel scholarship, please also attach a budget based on minimum cost travel.

Applications are invited from January 11th 2021.

The application deadline is March 15th 2021.

An early application is highly recommended due to space constraints. Successful applicants will be contacted by April 10th 2021.

Preparation:

A major purpose of the course is to provide participants with comments on their on-going work. It is therefore obligatory for all participants to submit a draft paper which will be discussed during the course.

Paper submission

The paper should be approximately 10 pages long (4000 – 5000 words, excluding the bibliography). You should submit a paragraph attached to the paper where you specify what you need feedback on, where you are in the process and what your ideas for publishing are.

Students who are admitted to the course should submit their draft paper electronically to the course secretariat by 4th June 2021.

This paper may be revised and resubmitted for evaluation and approval after the course (please consult the section on ‘Credits’ below).

All draft paper submissions will be posted on the course’s password protected intranet site. All participants are required to read draft papers for their allocated working groups in advance and provide feedback during the course. (You may of course read others as you wish.)

Syllabus and programme

A complete reading list (with links to online publications, when possible) of approximately 1000 pages will available on the course’s intranet site by 19th April 2021.

Participants are expected to read the syllabus in advance of the course.

Participants are expected to attend morning and afternoon sessions, and evening sessions when relevant, on all three days.

Credits:

  • Credits: Course participants will receive a Course Certificate, recommending either 10 or 3 ECTS credits, but your own institution must approve credits for the course. We therefore recommend that you contact your Ph.D. coordinator about the issue of credits prior to your participation.
  • For a Certificate recommending 10 credits, a revised paper of 15 – 20 pages (6000 - 8000 words) must be submitted to the course organisers no later than 8 weeks after completion of the course, and the paper must be graded with ‘pass’. (The paper will be evaluated by a course lecturer and assessed within eight weeks after submission).
  • 3 ECTS credits will be recommended for those who participate in full but choose not to submit a revised paper for evaluation (or for those whose revised paper does not pass).

The Norwegian Researcher School in Environmental Humanities (NoRS-EH) invites applicants to attend a week-long PhD course entitled “Environmental Storytelling and Narrative,” held by Environmental Humanities Research Group, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).

Instructors: Cajetan Iheka (Yale), Garth Paine (Arizona State), Nicole Seymour (Cal State Fullerton), Julia Leyda (NTNU), Hanna Musiol (NTNU), Tore Størvold (NTNU), Ingvil Førland Hellstrand (UiS)

This course will explore the centrality of storytelling and diverse narrative practices in the environmental humanities, not only as tools of communication that promote understanding of complex environmental processes and capture ecological imagination, but also as catalysts to emotion and pathways to civic engagement. Students will examine how several central areas of inquiry within EH research theorize and engage with narration, both broadly across the international field as well as more locally in the Nordic region (including collaborations with the cultural institutions in Trondheim).

During five days of seminars and workshops, students will master practical and collaborative project work facilitated by experts in the field. Streams will include attention to theories and methods appropriate to the study of postcolonialism, popular culture, music and sound studies, and intermediality in connection to environmental storytelling and narrative. In addition, this course will include a practical hands-on component and a special focus on public dissemination and cooperation with community partners. Students will develop an outward-facing public engagement output as their final project.

The course is currently planned to happen online, with some in-person component if possible, pending the status of the pandemic. However, in these COVID-19 times, we have designed a flexible format that will work online if necessary. Teachers not based in Europe will participate remotely. We will make a final decision two weeks before the course starts if we must change the teaching mode to fully remote for all participants.

Who can apply:

Participants must be enrolled in a PhD program to join this course. You can attend this course either at the beginning of your research or at a later writing-up stage of your project. Other candidates such as early stage postdoc researchers and specialized final stage master students can be accepted. Priority is given to applicants who are NoRS-EH members; membership is open to all current PhD students based in Norwegian universities who are working with environmental humanities-related topics and methods (see https://www.uis.no/en/node/1760 for details about the quick and easy membership process). There is no fee to attend the course. However, students are responsible for paying their own travel and lodging, except NoRS-EH members, who will have their travel and accommodation costs covered by the researcher school.

Application details:

Please submit via email a single PDF document that includes your name, department, university, title and expected completion date of doctoral dissertation, as well as a 200-word description of your project and 200-word explanation of why you would like to take part. Also include your contact information with the email address you check most often. Submit your application before January 11.

Applications and inquiries to Professor Julia Leyda julia.leyda@ntnu.no (please include course code in the email subject line EH8000).

Facts about the course:

  •     Course code: EH8000 Topics in Environmental Humanities (https://www.ntnu.edu/studies/courses/EH8000#tab=omEmnet)
  •     Credits: 5 ECTS (enrollment deadline in February)
  •     Teaching language: English
  •     Examination: Pass/Fail, public engagement project

Organised by The Greenhouse, University of Stavanger and the Norwegian Researcher School in Environmental Humanities (NoRS-EH).

Whom will you meet?

Keynote speaker: Dr. Bethany Wiggin (Director, Penn Program in Environmental Humanities)

Other speakers: Finn Arne Jørgensen (UiS), Dolly Jørgensen (UiS), Helleik Syse (UiS), Eric Dean Rasmussen (UiS), Phil Buckland (Umeå University), Hugo Reinert (UiO), Rachel Douglas-Jones (IT University of Copenhagen), Hanna Musiol (NTNU).  

The Norwegian Researcher School in Environmental Humanities invites applicants to attend a week-long PhD course on “Doing environmental humanities in a digital world,” organized by The Greenhouse at University of Stavanger.

Where do the digital and nature meet?

Rather than consider these as opposing realms, this course seeks to bring them together. How can students and scholars in the environmental humanities engage with digital natures? How can we embrace and use digital media to explore and present environment-specific research? Graduate training in environmental humanities has only to a small degree engaged with the many challenges of digital media to the field. This PhD course aims to enable its participants to meet this challenge through a week-long exploration of key themes, methods, tools, and discussions in the emerging field of digital environmental humanities.

During five intense days, students will combine practical and collaborative project work with workshops taught by experts in the field to explore the place of the digital in the environmental humanities. The participants will produce a collective public-facing project that explores the course theme, and they will write an individual 3000-word essay that reflects on the process of producing the public-facing project.

The course is currently planned to happen in-person in Stavanger, making use of spacious new interactive classrooms and the high-tech Didactic Digital Workshop at the university. These rooms will allow for appropriate distancing during teaching. However, in these COVID-19 times, we have designed a flexible format that will work

online if necessary. Teachers not located in Stavanger will attend remotely. We will make a final decision two weeks before the course starts if we have to change the teaching mode to fully remote for all participants.

How to apply

Contact Professor Finn Arne Jørgensen for further details: finn.a.jorgensen@uis.no

Participants must be admitted to a PhD programme to enroll on this course. Priority is given to applicants who are NoRS-EH members. There is no fee to attend the course. However, students are responsible for paying their own travel and lodging, except NoRS-EH members, who will have their travel and accommodation costs covered by the researcher school. You can attend this course either at the beginning of your research or at a later writing-up stage of your project. Other candidates such as early stage postdoc researchers and specialised final stage master students can be accepted. With the COVID-19 travel restrictions, we are targeting students currently located in Norway for this course (but not necessarily enrolled at a Norwegian university).

Facts about the course

  • Course code: DLV280 Themes in environmental humanities
  • Credits: 5 ECTS
  • Teaching language: English
  • Examination: Pass/Fail, collective project 50%, individual essay 50%

This course was organised by the University of Bergen.

This course was held digitally because of the corona situation. It discussed climate change from several perspectives within environmental humanities. These included narrative and linguistic approaches, where narratives and concepts are heuristic tools which help to make sense of reality, of the environment, and of the past, the present and the future. As such, narratives and concepts play an important role in structuring how people reason and talk about climate change, and in guiding decision making and action – or non-action. Temporality and long-term perspectives were another focus, including discussions on historicity and futurity, as well as historical and archaeological studies. The discussion here was of how multiple temporalities are entwined in various discourses on climate change. The course also addressed how measuring and calculation of global climate change depends on advanced computing and huge amounts of global scale data. Thus, a major challenge in communicating the severity of climate change to a larger audience is that it is not directly observable. The course discussed the challenges concerning exhibiting climate change given this problem in communicating it.

This course was organised by the Oslo School of Environmental Humanities.

In the Anthropocene, it becomes increasingly clear that environmental issues cannot be understood from the perspective of a single discipline. This research-oriented course was aimed at graduates from the humanities and social sciences who work on environmental topics and wished to expand their repertoire of theories, research skills, and creative methods. The course put special emphasis on creative and unconventional research methods and modes of representations, such as the use of film, photography, sound recordings, art installations, or exhibitions. It served as an introduction to theories and research methods in the interdisciplinary field of environmental humanities.

Publications

This section lists publications by NoRS-EH members.

NoRSH-EH member Laura Op de Beke, University of Oslo, has published “Premediating climate change in videogames: Repetition, mastery, and failure,” Nordic Journal of Media Studies 3, no. 1 (2021): 184-199.

This article starts with the observation that growth-oriented, techno-futurist narratives are predominant in climate change videogames. It then accounts for the lack of variety by arguing that these videogames are privileged expressions of premediation. Premediation cultivates a multiplicity of future scenarios, while at the same time delimiting them to suit presentist concerns, evoking a sense of inevitability and predictability strengthened by repetition. The iterative, branching temporality at work in this logic is deeply ingrained in videogames, as the trope of mastery through repetition and its analysis requires attentive-ness to the affective dimensions of gameplay. If videogames are to engage with the climate crisis more productively, they must develop different temporalities in which the potentiality of the future is preserved. In this article, Op de Beke analyses the games Fate of the World and The Stillness of the Wind to demonstrate how videogames premediate climate change and how they can explore other temporalities latent in the present.

Marius Palz has published the article “A Sea Cow Goes to Court: Extinction and Animal Agency in a Struggle Against Militarism,” Relations: Beyond Anthropocentrism 8, no. 1-2 (2020). The article is available online at https://www.ledonline.it/index.php/Relations/article/view/2467/1419. His draft article was discussed as a work-in-progress in the NoRS-EH monthly meeting back in May 2020, so it is great to see it published now.

In this article, Palz examines a conflict in Japan’s southernmost prefecture, Okinawa, over the construction of a new military base for the United States Marine Corps within potential feeding grounds of the critically endangered Okinawa dugong. Because of its critical status close to regional extinction, the dugong was declared a Natural Monument of Japan in 1972, arguably putting it under protection of the United States National Historic Preservation Act in context of the base construction. Based on this assumption, and the dugong’s cultural significance for the people of Okinawa, the issue was brought to an American court, a rare case where an animal plays a central role in a lawsuit dealing with cultural property. Based on Eduardo Kohn’s anthropology beyond the human and his thoughts on life as a semiotic process the article explores the entanglements between dugongs and people. Palz argue sthat in this process dugongs play an active role. Through their interpretation of the generated indexical signs at the construction site and their resulting behaviour, these animals give humans the opportunity to convert their presence and absence into the sphere of symbolic human interaction.

Studenter

Matthew Dalziel

PhD researcher at The Oslo School of Architecture and Design

Malin Graesse

PhD researcher at the University of Oslo

Aster Hoving

PhD researcher at the University of Stavanger

Berit Huntebrinker

PhD researcher at the University of Agder

Samuel Klee

PhD researcher at the University of Oslo

Endre Harvold Kvangraven

PhD researcher at the University of Stavanger

Sebastian Lundsteen Nielsen

PhD researcher at the University of Stavanger

Kim Kirsten Ménage

PhD researcher at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology

Hedda Susanne Molland

PhD researcher at the University of Bergen

Laura Op de Beke

PhD researcher at the University of Oslo

Mehdi Torkaman Momeni

PhD researcher at the University of Stavanger

Gitte Westergaard

PhD researcher at the University of Stavanger

Sonja Irene Åman

PhD researcher at the University of Oslo