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Core scale

At core scale we focus on IOR mechanisms; improving macroscopic and microscopic sweep efficiency.

Publisert: Endret:

Photo: Marius Vervik

Task leader: Arne Stavland, research manager, NORCE (arst@norceresearch.no)

At core scale we focus on IOR mechanisms; improving macroscopic and microscopic sweep efficiency. The key research questions are how chemicals travels through a porous media, the role of mineral wettability in determining the fluid flow in porous media and how to model the chemical systems.

The project DOUCS – Deliverable of an Unbeatable Core Scale Simulator aims to develop a tool for improved simulation of EOR processes at the core scale. Strongly related projects are the two postdoc projects on Integrated EOR for Heterogeneous Reservoirs by postdoc Bergit Brattekås and Description of the Rheological Properties of Complex Fluids Based on the Kinetic Theory by postdoc Dmitry Shogin. In addition, the two PhD projects, Core scale modeling of EOR Transport by PhD student Oddbjørn Nødland and Mechanisms and Flow of non-Newtonian Fluids in Porous Media by PhD student Irene Ringen.

The project Core plug preparation procedures addresses the importance of representative wettability conditions in SCAL and EOR -experiments and aims to develop methods to determine whether reservoir core plugs are contaminated by mud. This project is strongly related to the project Wettability estimation by oil adsorption by the PhD candidate Samuel Erzuah. In the PhD project the main focus is to use a new experimental technique (QCM-D) to measure oil adsorption on mineral surfaces. The QCM-D technique relates the vibrational frequency of a mineral plate to the mass of the adsorbent on the plate.

The project Application of metallic Nanoparticles for Enhanced Oil Recovery, by PhD student Kun Guo, aims to in-situ catalyze decomposition of heavy hydrocarbons leading to lower oil viscosity and improved mobility.

Three PhD projects addresses the effect of pore fluids on the geo-mechanical and wetting properties of chalk materials. The chalk matrix is sensitive to physical forces such as the overburden and pore fluid pressure and chemical interactions inside the cores. In the PhD work we try to relate macroscopic observable oil production, permeability change, and deformation to microscopic changes in the geochemistry by methods developed in Task 2. The PhD thesis are: (i) Thermal properties of reservoir rocks, role of pore fluids, minerals and diagenesis – a comparative study of two differently indurated chalks by PhD student Tijana Voake, (ii) Permeability and stress state by PhD student Emanuela I Kallesten where a close collaboration to Task 2 exist in regard of the application of the developed ‘tool box’ for analytical studies of mineralogical changes in samples of EOR experiments, (iii) How does wetting property dictate the mechanical strength of chalk at in-situ stress, temperature and pore pressure conditions, by PhD student Jaspreet Singh Sachdeva.

1.1.3 Wettability estimation by oil adsorption (PhD project)

1.1.4 Core scale modeling of EOR transport mechanisms (PhD project)

1.1.5 Application of metallic nanoparticles for enhanced heavy oil recovery (PhD project)

1.1.6 Effect of wetting property on the mechanical strength of chalk at hydrostatic, and in-situ stress and temperature conditions (PhD project)

1.1.7 Thermal properties of reservoir rocks, role of pore fluids, minerals and diagenesis. A comparative study of two differently indurated chalks (PhD project)

1.1.8 Flow of non-Newtonian fluids in porous media

1.1.9 Integrated EOR for heterogeneous reservoirs (postdoc project)

1.1.11 Permeability and stress state (PhD project)

1.1.13 Reservoir wettability and its effect on water-based recovery processes (postdoc report)