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Researcher breakfast: The Future Past project: Medieval life before and after death

Torsdag 3. november 2022 kl. 09:00-10:00,
Jernaldergården.

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Publisert: Endret:

The Future Past project: Medieval life before and after death

Skeletons tell stories. How talkative the dead are, depends upon their level of preservation.

In the study of past humans, few finds are more telling than remains of the humans themselves. Bone and teeth have always been important evidence for archaeologists and have only become more so with the advent of new methods such as ancient DNA and protein analyses. Such biomolecules tell stories of individuals and populations through time. Unfortunately, the material is sensitive to decay and contamination. This may compromise analyses and limit our ability to make skeletons talk.

But what factors determine the preservation of archaeological biological remains, including biomolecules? To investigate this question, the Future Past project will carry out an excavation of a medieval cemetery in Stavanger, Norway as well as the analysis of skeletal remains in the collections of the city’s university museum. In-depth analyses of skeletons will illustrate the value of the material as an archive of lived life. Where did the first Stavanger urban dwellers come from? How did their lives compare to those in rural areas considering diet and health?

At this researcher breakfast researcher Hege Hollund will give a presentation of the Future Past project.

About the event

The event is open for researchers, PhD candidates and anyone else interested.

Registration will open three weeks prior to the event.

Breakfast will be served.

Please contact the coordinators for any questions: Marit Fosse or Inger Gåsemyr.

About Researhcer breakfast

Researcher breakfast logo, coffee cup

Start your workday with inspiring sessions while enjoying your breakfast! Meet other researchers, expand your network, catch up on the latest research at UiS, get useful tips and training. The Researcher Breakfasts are open for researchers, PhD candidates and anyone else interested. Hosted by the Research Department and the University Library.