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Well attended open seminar about Resilience

Almost 60 participants joined the SHARE Research Centers Open Resilience Seminar on the 20 March 2019. The participants represented various professional background ranging from representatives from Stavanger University Hospital (SUS), the Norwegian Investigation Board for Health (UKOM), master students and other academics from both University of Stavanger and other Norwegian Universities.

Well attended open seminar about Resilience

The seminar was held at Ydalir Campus Hotel and several researchers affiliated with SHARE contributed with lectures on a number of topics.

 

Centre director professor Karina Aase welcomed all the participants and was followed by a lecture from professor Jeffrey Braithwaite from Macquairie University, Sidney Australia. Jeffrey’s lecture was entitled “Resilience from a system perspective”.

 

Adjunct professor Carolyn Canfield from the University of British Columbia who is an independent citizen-patient and international leader in system-level patient engagement gave a lecture focusing on the patient perspective entitled “Resilience from a patient and carer perspective”. Associate professor Jane O’Hara from the University of Leeds joined in via Skype and gave a presentation entitled 'Patient and family perspectives in resilient healthcare research'.

 

Minna Silvennoinen from the University of Jyvaskyla, Finland gave her talk on the topic “Resilience from a collaborative learning perspective”. Minna is a post-doctoral researcher and her primary field of research is medical skills and expertise in both authentic work environments and simulated learning environments. Professor Stephen Billett continued the session via Skype and gave a talk entitled 'Collaborative learning in healthcare: Promoting resilience at work'. 

The open seminar program ended with professor Siri Wiig and professor Karina Aase from SHARE giving a lecture entitled “Resilence from a SHARE perspective” where they highlighted SHARE’s resilience related research activities both past and present work from numerous SHARE researchers.

Tekst by: Lene Schibevaag