MENY
This is the study programme for 2019/2020. It is subject to change.


Pragmatics can be informally defined as "the study of how-to-say-what-to-whom-when" (Bardovi-Harlig 2013:68) and interlanguage pragmatics studies how learners of a foreign or second language (L2) master the skill of using language to communicate appropriately in different social contexts. The course aims to introduce the major concepts and research findings related to pragmatic development in English in foreign and second language contexts. The topics to be covered include theories of L2 pragmatic development, development of various pragmatics features in young L2 learners, such as speech act comprehension and production, formulaic language, computer-mediated communication, and the role of instruction in pragmatics development.

Learning outcome

Knowledge
After completing the course, the student will have an in-depth knowledge of:
  • The major theories of L2 pragmatics development
  • The main developmental patterns of various pragmatic features in English in foreign and second language contexts
  • The research methods (both quantitative and qualitative) used within the field of interlanguage pragmatics and their application within Lesson study as a research tool
  • The relevant steps in collecting the literature on the subject, conducting and reporting on a Lesson study research project within interlanguage pragmatics

Skills
After completing the course, the student will be able to:
  • Discuss the main developmental patterns of various pragmatic features in English as a second language
  • Analyse and critically evaluate research papers in the field of interlanguage pragmatics
  • Choose relevant research topics and appropriate quantitative or qualitative approaches within the field of interlanguage pragmatics
  • Conduct and report on a Lesson study research project within interlanguage pragmatics

General competencies
The student will be able to:
  • Use academic English confidently and functionally in spoken and written discourse when reporting research
  • Apply their knowledge of English pragmatics to further develop their own language competence
  • Apply their knowledge of developmental patterns in L2 pragmatics and of research methodology in the field to English language teaching and to their own classroom research

Contents

The course builds on the knowledge and skills students have acquired in English Linguistics for Teachers and English Teaching Methodology 1 and 2.
Pragmatics can be informally defined as "the study of how-to-say-what-to-whom-when" (Bardovi-Harlig 2013:68) and interlanguage pragmatics studies how learners of a foreign or second language (L2) master the skill of using language to communicate appropriately in different social contexts. The course aims to introduce the major concepts and research findings related to pragmatic development in English in foreign and second language contexts. The topics to be covered include theories of L2 pragmatic development, development of various pragmatics features, such as speech act comprehension and production, formulaic language, computer-mediated communication, and the role of instruction in pragmatics development. Special attention will be devoted to research methodology in the field of second language acquisition in general and interlanguage pragmatics in particular, with a specific focus on research with young learners. The students will be expected to conduct a small-scale group research study in order to demonstrate their understanding of relevant topics and research approaches within interlanguage pragmatics as well as their ability to report their research findings in the form of a Lesson study project. The course will aim to provide opportunities for students to do their teaching practice and conduct their research at a partner university abroad.

Required prerequisite knowledge

The students taking the course should have taken the following course: MGL4036 (granted access to testing) or an IKS equivalent.

Recommended previous knowledge

The students taking the course should have reached the CEFR C1 level in English in reading, writing, speaking and listening .

Exam

Portfolio and oral exam
Weight Duration Marks Aid
Portfolio3/5 A - F
Oral exam2/5 A - F
Portfolio - 4 group hand-ins: 10 000 words +/- 10%.
Portfolio - 1 individual hand-in: 2500 words +/- 10%.
Pair/Group oral presentation: 15% of the grade based on the group performance, 25% on individual performance.
All parts must be passed to get a final grade.

Coursework requirements

Compulsory assignments, Mandatory attendance
  1. Students need to complete their teaching practice.
  2. Students must attend a minimum of 70% of all lectures and seminars.
  3. Students need to present and critically evaluate a research article in class.

These must be approved before the students can be examined. Students who have one or more assignments not approved at first submission, will be given one more submission opportunity in a new and improved version.

Course teacher(s)

Course teacher
Deborah Lynn Sorton Larssen
Course coordinator
Milica Savic
Head of Department
Elin Marie Thuen
Programme coordinator
Kjersti Gjedrem

Method of work

This course will utilize a combination of lectures, seminars, students' presentations and students' research work. Much of the course content is not age specific and for that reason many topics will be presented to both groups at the same time. However, some of these topics will be contextualized and discussed at a deeper level in separate GLU1-7 & GLU5-10 seminar groups. Students are expected to work on individual and group assignments in study groups and conduct a small-scale research project during the course.

Course assessment

Tidligdialog gjennomføres hvert semester og det etableres et fagutvalg med studentrepresentanter. I tillegg evalueres emnet minst hvert tredje år, i tråd med fakultetets regler for kvalitetssikring.

Literature

Obligatory reading
Bardovi-Harlig, K. 2013. Developing L2 pragmatics. Language Learning. 63, 68-86.
Kasper, G. 2008. Data Collection in Pragmatics Research. In H. Spencer-Oatey (Ed.), Culturally Speaking: Culture, Communication and Politeness Theory (279-303). London & New York: Continuum.
Kasper, G. and Rose, K. R. 2002. Pragmatic Development in a Second Language. Oxford: Blackwell Publishing Limited.
Kasper, G., & Schmidt, R. 1996. Developmental issues in interlanguage pragmatics. Studies in Second Language Acquisition. 18, 149-169.
Merrison, A. J., Wilson, J. J., Davies, B. L. and Haugh, M. 2012. Getting stuff done: Comparing e-mail requests from students in higher education in Britain and Australia. Journal of Pragmatics. 44, 1077-1098.
Spencer-Oatey, H. 2008. Projects. In H. Spencer-Oatey (Ed.), Culturally Speaking: Culture, Communication and Politeness Theory (Second edition) (322-325). London, New York: Continuum. (Original work published 2000)
Taguchi, N. 2010. Longitudinal studies in interlanguage pragmatics. In A. Trosborg (Ed.), Pragmatics across languages and cultures (333-361). Berlin & New York: De Gruyter Mouton.
Yates, L. 2010. Pragmatic challenges for second language learners. In A. Trosborg (Ed.), Pragmatics across languages and cultures (287-308). Berlin & New York: De Gruyter Mouton.
Selected chapters from:
Achiba, M. 2002. Learning to Request in a Second Language: Child Interlanguage Pragmatics. Clevedon, England: Multilingual Matters.
Allwright, D. & Hanks, J. 2009. The Developing Language Learner. An Introduction to Exploratory Practice. Palgrave Macmillan.
Ishihara, N., & Cohen, A. 2010. Teaching and Learning Pragmatics: Where Language and Culture Meet. Harlow, UK: Longman Applied Linguistics/Pearson Education.
Portoles Falomir, L. 2015. Multilingualism and Very Young Learners. An Analysis of Pragmatic Awareness and Language Attitudes. Berlin/Boston: De Gruyter Mouton.
Articles and book chapters for student presentations (one to three articles to be chosen by each pair)
Bjørge, A. K. 2007. Power distance in English lingua franca email communication. International Journal of Applied Linguistics. 17(1), 60-80.
Brubæk, S. 2012. Pragmatics competence in English at the VG1 level: To what extent are Norwegian students able to adapt to contextual demands when making requests in English? Acta Didactica Norge. 6(1), 1-19.
Ellis, R. 1992. Learning to communicate in the classroom. A study of two language learners' requests. Studies in Second Language Acquisition. 14(1), 1-23.
Rose, K. 2000. An exploratory cross-sectional study of interlanguage pragmatics development. Studies in Second Language Acquisition. 22(1). 27-67.
Rose, K. 2009. Interlanguage pragmatic development in Hong Kong, phase 2. Journal of Pragmatics. 41(11), 2345-2364.
Røkaas, F. A. 2000. Potential for misunderstandings: Social interaction between Norwegians and Americans. In M. Isaksson & F. A. Røkaas (Eds.), Conflicting Values: An Intercultural Challenge (111-129). Sandvika: Norwegian School of Management BI.
Savi, M. 2015. "Can I very please borrow it?": Request development in young Norwegian EFL learners. Intercultural Pragmatics. 12(4), 443-480.
Yates, L., & Major, G. 2015. "Quick-chatting", "smart dogs", and how to "say without saying": Small talk and pragmatic learning in the community, System. 48, 141-152.


This is the study programme for 2019/2020. It is subject to change.

Sist oppdatert: 18.08.2019