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Frontier Quantum Theory FYS902

This course explores advanced topics on the analytic and numerical solution of modern quantum field theories.


Course description for study year 2022-2023. Please note that changes may occur.

Facts
Course code

FYS902

Version

1

Credits (ECTS)

10

Semester tution start

Spring, Autumn

Number of semesters

1

Exam semester

Spring, Autumn

Language of instruction

English

Content

The course consists of two modules chosen each year, depending on the composition of the PhD student body, among the following three:

Module 1 (5ECTS - option1): Advanced Quantum Field Theory

         Renormalization and renormalization group         Non-Abelian Gauge theory         Spontaneous symmetry breaking and the Higgs mechanism         Standard model of electroweak and strong interactions         Thermal field theory         Selected advanced topics (anomalies, topological defects, phase transitions)

Module 2 (5ECTS - option2): Numerical Simulation Methods

          Statistical Mechanics and Spin Models          Monte-Carlo Methods          Deterministic Partial Differential Equations          Stochastic Processes and Stochastic PDEs          Data Analysis methods

Module 3 (5ECTS - option3): Lattice Field Theory

          Statistical Mechanics and Spin Models          Renormalization in the Ising Model          Scalar Lattice Field Theory          Gauge Lattice Field Theory          Fermions on the Lattice          Real-Time Methods and Challenges          Sign-Problem

 

Literature:  

Module 1: Michael Kachelriess: Quantum Fields, From the Hubble to the Planck Scale, Oxford University Press, 2017

Module 2: notes by the lecturer, Kloeden and Platen, Numerical Solution of Stochastic Differential Equations, Springer 1992

Module 3: Jan Smit, Introduction to quantum fields on a lattice (Cambridge Lecture Notes in Physics), Cambridge University Press, 2002, Montvay and Munster, Quantum fields on a lattice, Cambridge University Press, 1994

Learning outcome

The course consists of two modules chosen each year, depending on the composition of the PhD student body. The learning outcome then consists of the corresponding two of the three modules below.

Module 1 After having taken this module, the student will be versatile enough to understand the main quantitative properties of a quantum field theory, defined by a given Lagrangian. They will have the skills, among others, to find the ground state of the theory and decide whether it spontaneously breaks some symmetry or not, renormalize the theory and quantify the effects of quantum corrections such as running of the couplings, and map out the phase diagram of the theory. 

Module 2: When the students have finished this course module, we hope that they have achieved the following learning outcomes: I feel confident to discuss central concepts of statistical physics using a simple spin model. I easily recall challenges in discretising common deterministic partial differential equations arising in physics. I see no difficulty in explaining the basic properties of stochastic processes and the different challenges they pose for numerical solution; I have a basic theoretical and practical understanding of Monte-Carlo methods to evaluate highly dimensional integrals;  I have gained a good understanding of the concepts underlying data analysis and am aware of common pitfalls in the interpretation of simulation data; I feel confident to deploy the numerical simulation tools studied in this course to the study of real-world problems that I encounter in my PhD thesis. 

Module 3 When the students have finished this course module, we hope that they have achieved the following learning outcomes: I feel confident to discuss central concepts of statistical physics using a simple spin model; I see no difficulty in explaining the basic concepts of lattice regularised field theory using scalar fields as an example; I have a basic understanding of the concept of renormalization and am aware of its application in lattice field theory and spin models;  I have gained a first look into the structure and principles underlying lattice gauge theory as well as fermions on the lattice; I feel excited and empowered to study real-world problems that I encounter in my master or PhD thesis work using lattice field theory methods.

Required prerequisite knowledge
None
Recommended prerequisites
FYS610 Quantum Field Theory
Exam
Form of assessment Weight Duration Marks Aid
Oral exam/Take-home project 1/1 Passed / Not Passed

Course teacher(s)
Course coordinator: Anders Tranberg
Course coordinator: Alexander Karl Rothkopf
Course teacher: Germano Nardini
Course teacher: Tomas Brauner
Course teacher: Anders Tranberg
Method of work
Lectures, seminars, guided reading, tutorials
Open for
Technology and Natural Science - PhD programme
Course assessment
Questionnaire and discussion with the students 
Literature
Search for literature in Leganto