SHARE – Centre for Resilience in Healthcare

Norway’s largest research group studying quality and safety in healthcare

About SHARE

The research centre will contribute to changing the understanding of quality and safety in today's healthcare services through the development and use of a framework for resilience that encompasses all levels of the healthcare services. The University of Stavanger manages the centre.

The Centre for Resilience in Healthcare (SHARE) is currently one of eight research centres at the University of Stavanger. SHARE’s strategic vision is to become an internationally recognized research centre by reforming the understanding of quality and safety in current healthcare systems using a new and comprehensive resilience in healthcare framework. To achieve this, the centre will develop and disseminate new knowledge on resilience at all levels of healthcare.

SHARE is a multidisciplinary research centre. About 70 researchers are affiliated with the centre, including nurses, medical doctors, psychologists, physiotherapists, occupational therapist, lawyers, sociologist, engineers, and safety scientists. The centre’s main pillar is the solid base of PhD scholars conducting research in areas such as interdisciplinary teamwork and competence, co-production and involvement, telecare, regulation, evaluation of improvement measures, and analysis of healthcare processes.

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Research projects

Activities

News

Global State of Patient Safety 2023 – Supporting Leaders

At a time when healthcare is at a crossroads, the "Global State of Patient Safety 2023 – Supporting Leaders" seminar hos...

Oslo University Hospital is a new partner in SHARE

As a new partner, Section for Acute and Pre-hospital care at Oslo University Hospital strengthens research on prehospita...

Annual report for SHARE 2023

Knowledge is most valuable when it is shared generously – read the annual report for Centre for Resilience in Healthcare...

Gathering International Researchers at Sola

SHARE – Center for Resilience in Healthcare at UiS is hosting Resilient Health Care Society’s summer conference at Sola ...

Prestigious EU grant for Health Services Research

Researchers at the University of Stavanger have received 6 million euros from the prestigious EU research program Horizo...

Improving mental health services with and for indigenous and ethnic minority youth

The InvolveMENT project aims to improve the mental health of indigenous and ethnic minority youth by meeting their perso...

A Care Strategy for caregivers and care receivers by the EU

During the conference “From Knowledge to Action – the role of carers is changing?” in Oslo on March 16 Stecy Yghemonos h...

Patients and families engaged in resilient healthcare systems

Patients and their families contribute to the resilience of healthcare systems. This is particularly evident as global h...

Greater focus on the role of informal caregivers

Maja Hassel, next of kin and caregiver, thinks this year’s conference theme "Caregivers - from extra work to sound invol...

Two worlds colliding: exploring the boundaries between system resilience and individual resilience

A recent webinar organised by the Resilient Health Care Network focused on the intersection of individual psychological ...

A Guide to Patient and Stakeholder Involvement (PSI) in Research

As a part of SHARE – Centre for Resilience in Healthcare’s overarching vision of reforming the understanding of quality ...

Annual report for SHARE 2022

Knowledge is most valuable when it is shared generously – read the annual report for Centre for Resilience in Healthcare...

Calls for more international research collaboration

Professor Stephen Billett from Griffith University Australia, is involved in several of SHARE – Centre for Resilience in...

Gathers international researchers at the University of Stavanger

SHARE – Center for Resilience in Healthcare is hosting an international quality and safety in healthcare seminar at Ydal...

UiS researchers carry out project for the Norwegian Board of Health Supervision

Sina Furnes Øyri and Inger Johanne Bergerød have been awarded a contract research project on a nationwide supervision of...

Researching country wide system audit of the follow-ups of children living in foster homes 2022-23

The project will explore the impact of an upcoming country wide system audit on the child welfare services’ management a...

Teamwork in hospital: a human factors approach

Effective teamwork and sufficient communication are critical components essential to patient safety in today’s specializ...

InvolveMENT – for adolescents’ mental health

This research project will contribute to strengthen access to and the quality of healthcare services for adolescents who...

QUALinCLINstud - Aiming for quality in nursing home care

The QUALinCLINstud project addresses the urgent need for improved quality in clinical supervision and assessment of stud...

SAFE-LEAD - Improving quality and safety in primary care

Many leaders in primary care experience a lack of effective tools in dealing with quality and safety issues to ensure th...

Resilience in Healthcare

The primary goal of the Resilience in Healthcare (RiH) project is to reform the quality of current healthcare systems by...

Network for Carer Research

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Learning tools

This part of the website will contain learning tools, tips and tricks that we have learned from our research.

Resilience in Healtcare project- collaboartive learning

A guide to Patient and Stakeholder Involvement in Research

As a part of SHARE – Centre for Resilience in Healthcare’s overarching vision of reforming the understanding of quality and safety of current healthcare systems , patient and stakeholder involvement (PSI) in SHARE’s research activities is a key strategic priority. The aim of SHARE’s PSI strategy is to encourage and facilitate a broad spectrum of patient and stakeholder involvement across all of SHARE’s research activities, to increase the relevance and impact of our research. Read this article for more information.

Involving adolescents in research

In the InvolveMENT project, a research article has been published with ten co-authors aged 18 to 23 about the experience of being involved in research on young people's mental health. Read their recommendations below

  1. Expand researchers’ knowledge and competence about adolescent involvement in research. Examples: Part of master students’ and PhD candidates’ curriculum, and additional training for their supervisors and other researchers.
  2. Consider the ethical implications of involving adolescents in the research, including to ensure that all parties are aware of everybody’s rights and responsibilities.
  3. Consider the need for involvement and shared decision-making power at different stages of the research. Agree on consultation, collaboration or control of the research.
  4. Explore researchers’ and adolescents’ motives for participating, including their values, to establish a common starting point. This may also require consideration of the “research culture” within scientific communities, and potentially a need to change the culture.
  5. Provide appropriate training and support for adolescents. Examples: Seminars providing an introduction to research, mental health research, research design and methods.Usea variety of approaches for communication, e.g. digital tools such as WhatsApp and Messenger.
  6. Researchers’ and co-researchers’ willingness to contribute and agreement on adolescents’ roles and extent of involvement. Examples: Sharing experiences and perspectives, expanding own knowledge, and take on tasks. This may lead to decisions of whether adolescents participate as representatives or co-researchers.
  7. Establish a good collaborative relationship and reduce power differentials. Spend time together to build a trusting relationship and reduce feelings of uncertainty. Avoid using research jargon.
  8. Provide sufficient resources including funding and time to enable collaboration. Funding for remuneration, compensation of expenses (e.g. for travel), meetings and research activities.
  9. Ensure diversity in adolescent representation suitable to the research project. Examples: Different cultural backgrounds, genders, sexual orientation, education, life experience and attitudes/approaches towards mental health.
  10. Ensure flexible and effective project management, to ensure that goals are reached and everyone’s time and efforts are valued. Examples: Plan ahead of time, but adapt. Facilitate encouraging meetings. Adapt meeting times and venues to accommodate adolescents’ school, work and other activities/obligations (e.g. meet after working hours, weekends). Food and fun activities during meetings. Conflict management.

Reference: Viksveen P, Cardenas NE, Ibenfeldt M, Meldahl LG, Krijger L, Game JR, Andvik MM, Cuddeford O, Duerto S, Mustafa M, Tong M. Involvement of adolescent representatives and coresearchers in mental health research: Experiences from a research project. Health Expect. 2021 Nov 10. doi: 10.1111/hex.13383. https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/hex.13383

Strategies and annual report

Here you will find the centre's strategies for research, user involvement and dissemination for the period 2023-2027, as well as annual reports from 2017-2022.

Collaborative learning

Strategies

Annual reports

Information to new members

Welcome to SHARE – Centre for Resilience in Healthcare. Here we have gathered useful information for new researchers in the centre.

Nærbilde av helsepersonell som smiler til en kollega

About SHARE 

SHARE is a research centre based at the University in Stavanger (UiS). The centre was established in 2017 and has currently two national partners; the Patient safety research group at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology Gjøvik  and Prehospital - and Acute Division at Oslo University hospital. SHARE constitutes Norway’s largest research group studying quality and safety in healthcare. The centre board consists of seven permanent members and five alternates. All partners are represented. 

Multidisciplinary centre 

SHARE is a multidisciplinary research centre. About 70 researchers are affiliated with the centre, including nurses, medical doctors, psychologists, physiotherapists, occupational therapist, lawyers, sociologist, engineers, and safety scientists. The centre’s main pillar is the solid base of PhD scholars conducting research in areas such as interdisciplinary teamwork and competence, co-production and involvement, telecare, regulation, evaluation of improvement measures, and analysis of healthcare processes. Network for Carer Research is also organized by the centre. 

Centre lead and contacts 

The centre director is Professor Siri Wiig. Lene Schibevaag and Inger Johanne Bergerød are centre coordinators and Cecilie Haraldseid-Driftland is responsible for communication and dissemination. 

Activities in SHARE 

SHARE organizes and provides a variety of arenas for research dissemination, information sharing, and social gatherings. The invitations are sent by e-mail so make sure that you are on the email list (contact Lene). Examples of activities are listed below: 

  • Monthly research meetings. This is an arena were there will be a variety of different presentations that contributes to a fruitful discussion, and this is also an arena for PHD candidates to present their work and get feedback (Contact: Lene).  
  • PHD and Postdoctor lunch. This is an informal arena where we learn and share tips and tricks. Lunch is free if you sign up for the calendar invite (Contact: Inger) 
  • Writing seminars are provided annually. The seminars provide an opportunity to focus on structured writing, but also to meet up with colleagues that normally work form other locations in Norway.  
  • Christmas meeting is a SHARE tradition marking the beginning of the holidays. This is a fun event, and we also share a nice meal together.  

In addition, there is during the year a range of popular science contributions offered through medias such as podcasts, lectures, stand-up comedy and social media contributions. The aim is to make research results related to quality and safety in healthcare easily accessible both nationally and internationally. The SHARE researchers recognize the importance of becoming active contributors in the public debate in popular scientific channels and strive to contribute at different arenas.  Invitations to these activities will come via the e-mail list, and everyone is welcome to join.  

Research strategies and annual reports 

As a part of SHARE – Centre for Resilience in Healthcare’s overarching vision of reforming the understanding of quality and safety of current healthcare systems, patient and stakeholder involvement (PSI) in SHARE’s research activities is a key strategic priority. The aim of SHARE’s PSI strategy is to encourage and facilitate a broad spectrum of patient and stakeholder involvement across all of SHARE’s research activities, to increase the relevance and impact of our research. 

Here you can access the strategy Patient and Stakeholder involvement (PSI) Strategy 2023-2027  

Other strategies recommended to read are:  

Every year SHARE reports highlights of research activities in the annual report. Read the 2022 annual report. Here you can learn more about SHARE activities in terms of large research projects, activities and publications, applications for funding, mobility, internationalisation and strategic efforts to position the centre as a recognised research environment.  

We wish you a warm welcome to SHARE, and please don’t hesitate to contact us if you need more information or guidance!  

Best wishes, 

Siri, Lene, Cecilie and Inger. 

Contact

The center director is Professor Siri Wiig. Lene Schibevaag is center coordinator and Cecilie Haraldseid-Driftland is responsible for communication and dissemination.

Professor
51834288
Faculty of Health Sciences
Department of Quality and Health Technology
Senterkoordinator
51834204
Faculty of Health Sciences
Department of Quality and Health Technology
Associate Professor
51834254
Faculty of Health Sciences
Department of Quality and Health Technology